Harold Burgess Lab

A postdoctoral position is available in the Unit on Behavioral Neurogenetics to study genetic and cellular mechanisms of behavior in larval zebrafish. Applicants should have a Ph.D. and a strong background in molecular biology or neurophysiology. To apply send a curriculum vitae, bibliography, cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to haroldburgess@mail.nih.gov.

Michael Cashel Lab

A postdoctoral position is available in our small lab for research projects emphasizing regulatory roles for ppGpp on gene expression and bacterial physiology at the molecular level. These regulatory adjustments have broad consequences for growth physiology, stress survival, pathogenesis and development. Our approaches rest mainly on bacterial genetics, enzyme manipulation, mutagenesis and biochemistry of unusual nucleotides. In particular, the work involves protein structure-function relationships for ppGpp synthetases and ppGpp hydrolases from diverse organisms. These projects frequently involve formal and informal collaborations and sharing between neighboring labs to take advantage of new ideas, approaches and techniques. Candidates with a PhD and with less than five years postdoctoral experience should send a description of the relationship anticipated between their careers and how work here will help achieve these goals, along with a c.v. and contact information for three references. Please visit the NIH PD Openings website and search for PD-4944: http://www2.training.nih.gov/pdopenings or contact Dr Cashel directly:cashelm@mail.nih.gov

Ajay Chitnis Lab

A postdoctoral training position is available in the Section on Neural Developmental Dynamics to study how interactions between cells during early development lead to the self-organization of a functional nervous system in zebrafish. The laboratory uses a combination of cellular, molecular and genetic tools to identify genetic regulatory networks that direct early development in the nervous system. We also build computational models to understand how interactions identified through biological experiments lead to the emergence of patterned development. Current projects are directed toward understanding the genetic regulatory networks that coordinate cell fate and morphogenesis during development of the lateral line system. Applications are invited from outstanding applicants with interests in cellular, molecular and genetic manipulation of zebrafish and/or with an interest in computational modeling of early neural development. Applicants should have a Ph.D or M.D and less than five years of postdoctoral experience. To apply send a curriculum vitae, bibliography and a cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests along with the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to chitnisa@mail.nih.gov.

David Clark Lab

A postdoctoral training position is available to study the roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling machines in determining chromatin structure and epigenetic effects in budding yeast and mouse, with an emphasis on the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes. We are also very interested in understanding how transcription proceeds through nucleosomes in vivo and in whether transcript termination by RNA polymerase II is rate-limiting. Please see our recent publications on my web page. We are using a combination of genome-wide approaches in vivo (including MNase-seq and ChIP-seq) and work in vitro with purified yeast chromatin to address mechanisms of gene activation. To apply, candidates should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, bibliography, and the names of three referees to Dr. David J. Clark: clarkda@mail.nih.gov (301 496-6966). Candidates must have less than 5 years postdoctoral experience. 

Robert Crouch Lab

Opportunities to examine genome instability in cells are available in the Section on Formation of RNA. Defects in proteins that remove RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids lead to loss of mitochondrial DNA resulting in embryonic lethality and a severe neurological disorder (Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome) in humans. Our research focuses on two cellular ribonucleases H that specifically recognize RNA of RNA/DNA hybrids and their relationships to defects in genome stability. Interested candidates must possess a Ph.D. and/or an M.D. degree and have a strong background in molecular biology and biochemistry. Experience in mouse development is desireable. Less than 5 years postdoctoral experience is required. To apply, candidates should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, bibliography, and contact information for three references to robert_crouch@nih.gov.

Igor Dawid Lab

We use molecular screens to identify genes that regulate vertebrate development. Some of the genes with regionally or temporally restricted expression discovered by this approach are subjected to detailed functional studies. Recent studies focused on the E3 ubiquitin ligase Lnx-2b. We showed that it has a role in regulating axis specification in the zebrafish embryo by limiting the stability of the organizer homeodomain factor Bozozok. In another project we have analyzed regulation of neural crest development. Of particular interest is a factor named Kctd15 which regulates Wnt signaling output in neural crest formation. Future studies will expand on these directions in analyzing vertebrate embryogenesis. For more information please contact idawid@nih.gov

Judith Kassis Lab

A postdoctoral position is available in the Section on Gene Expression, Program in Genomics of Development, NICHD in the laboratory of Dr. Judy Kassis. Projects include elucidating the mechanism of gene silencing by the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins; understanding the function and activity of promoter tethering elements; and understanding the interplay between enhancers and silencers in PcG-regulated target genes.  Our laboratory uses genetic (including Crisper-Cas9 genome editing), molecular, biochemical, and genomic tools (such as ChIP-Seq, and 3C-related approaches) and primarily utilizes Drosophila as the model system. We are seeking a PhD or MD graduate with less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience and an established publication record.  A strong background in molecular biology, genetics, cell biology, or bioinformatics is desired.  Interested candidates should send a cover letter, CV, a one-page description of research interests, and names of three references to Dr. Judy Kassis at jkassis@mail.nih.gov.

James Kennison Lab

The Section on Drosophila Gene Regulation uses genetic and developmental approaches to study transcriptional regulation. We are currently identifying cis-regulatory elements involved in homeotic gene silencing, and conducting genetic screens to identify the trans-acting factorsrequired for transcriptional silencing. Applicants should have a Ph.D. and/or an M.D. degree and less than 5 years of postdoctoral experience with a background in genetics, cell biology, or molecular biology. To apply, please send a statement of interest, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to Jim_Kennison@nih.gov.

Paul Love Lab

Our research focuses on the development of the mammalian hematopoietic system. Of particular interest is the characterization of signal transduction molecules and pathways that regulate T cell maturation in the thymus. Current projects include the generation of transgenic and conditional deletion mutants to evaluate the importance of T cell antigen receptor signaling at specific stages of T cell development. We are also using Microarray gene profiling to identify molecules that are important for thymocyte selection, a process that promotes the survival and development of functional T cells and the death of auto-reactive T cells. A recently initiated area of investigation focuses on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We have begun to characterize the genes that are important for the generation and maintenance of HSCs and for their differentiation into specific hematopoietic lineages.

Lab website: http://science.nichd.nih.gov/confluence/display/scdb/Home

Applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years' postdoctoral experience. To apply, click on the button below, or send a curriculum vitae, bibliography, cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to lovep@mail.nih.gov, or via post to:

Paul E. Love
NICHD, NIH
Building 6B, Room 2B-210
6 Center Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892

Todd Macfarlan Lab

Postdoc: Molecular Biology/Biochemistry/Genetics/Developmental Biology

Two postdoc positions available July 1 to study mechanisms of epigenome reprogramming in mammals at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The Section on Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming headed by Todd Macfarlan was established under the Earl Stadtman investigator program, designed to facilitate high risk-high impact science (http://irp.nih.gov/careers/careers-in-action/science-the-stadtman-way). The laboratory uses a multi-disciplinary approach combining molecular, biochemical, genetic, and cellular techniques to understand how epigenomes are modified during mouse development, with particular emphasis on the pre-implantation period and during development of the central nervous system. Current projects include exploring the context-dependent function of histone modifying enzymes during development and during differentiation of stem cells, studying the interplay of transcription factors and chromatin modifying enzymes during artificial reprogramming, and exploring the impact of endogenous retroviruses and their remnants on host genomes. Candidates will have access to multi-dimensional imaging core facilities, substantial mouse colony space, ample support for next generation sequencing applications (ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, etc.), and outstanding stipend support.

Requirements:

Interested candidates must have a Ph.D. or M.D. within the past five years in molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, or a related field. Experience with mouse genetics, mouse development, ES/iPS cell culture, and/or next generation sequencing approaches is a plus.

To apply:

Send a coverletter with desired start date, a CV with bibliography, a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references with contact information (including phone numbers) to todd.macfarlan@nih.gov.

Postdoc: Computational Scientist

A bioinformatics postdoctoral position is available July 1 to study mechanisms of epigenome reprogramming in mammals at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The Section on Mammalian Epigenome Reprogramming headed by Todd Macfarlan was established under the Earl Stadtman investigator program, designed to facilitate high risk-high impact science (http://irp.nih.gov/careers/careers-in-action/science-the-stadtman-way). The laboratory uses a multi-disciplinary approach combining molecular, biochemical, genetic, and cellular techniques to understand how epigenomes are modified during mouse development, with particular emphasis on the pre-implantation period and during development of the central nervous system. Current projects include exploring the context-dependent function of histone modifying enzymes during development and during differentiation of stem cells, studying the interplay of transcription factors and chromatin modifying enzymes during artificial reprogramming, and exploring the impact of endogenous retroviruses on host genomes.

The candidate will work closely with experimental biologists to study mechanisms of epigenome reprogramming, and will be expected to utilize available tools and develop new tools for comparative genomics analysis and analysis of next generation sequencing data (including ChIP-Seq, mRNA-Seq, miRNA-Seq, etc.) Opportunities for extensive collaboration with the NIH community are available.

Requirements:

The ideal candidate will have a Ph.D. in Computer Science, Biostatistics or Bioinformatics within the past five years. Programming skills with R, Python, Perl are required. Familiarity with Bowtie, Tophat, Cufflinks, BWA, Samtools, Bedtools, Bamtools, Muscle, MACS, and NCBI blast software is a plus, as is knowledge of on-line resources including UCSC Genome Browser, NCBI, Ensemble, DAVID, genetontology.org and AmiGO.

To apply:

Send a coverletter, a CV with bibliography, a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references with contact information (including phone numbers) to macfarlan@salk.edu.

Richard Maraia Lab

The Fellow will investigate molecular mechanisms involved in RNA metabolism relevant to the control of gene expression important for growth and development. This may include links between transcription, RNA processing, subcellular trafficking, and translation. One emphasis is on a relationship between global tRNA expression and mRNA-specific codon usage. Fission yeast as well as mammalian cell culture and gene-altered mice serve as a model systems. Laboratory approaches integrate genetics, cell and molecular biology, and also rely on biochemistry in the context of structural biology and Solexa sequencing technology. Candidates should email a cover letter that details his/her specific interest in the research areas described above and as reflected by the Maraia lab publications with a C.V., and names of three references with email and telephone contact to: Richard Maraia at maraiar@mail.nih.gov.

Keiko Ozato Lab

A post-doctoral position is expected to open in the fall of 2011 to study gene regulation in innate immunity.

Macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DC) confer resistance to pathogens and regulate inflammatory responses through transcriptional activation/repression of many genes. Our main focus is to investigate the underlying mechanisms of innate immunity. We study the activity of chromatin, chromatin binding proteins and transcription factors. Our current efforts center on studying the behavior of the replacement histone H3.3, bromodomain protein, Brd4 and IRF8, the transcription factor essential for the function of MΦ/¿DC. This position offers the opportunity for basic, laboratory research of high caliber and can be extended up to five years. Eligible candidates should have Ph. D or M.D, Ph.D within the past 5 years, or projected to receive it within a few months. Experiences in molecular biology, immunology and mouse genetics are preferred.
Contact Keiko Ozato via e-mail at ozatok@nih.gov.

Karl Pfeifer Lab

A postdoctoral position is available at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, to study the role of epigenetics in normal mammalian development. Our laboratory uses molecular, cellular, genetic, and gene knockout approaches to study the regulated expression and functions of a cluster of imprinted genes on the distal end of mouse chromosome 7. The human equivalent on chromosome 11p15.5 is clinically of great importance as mutations in the region are associated with Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome, with several types of childhood and adult cancers, and with inherited cardiac arrhythmias. Our current research is focused on three goals. We want to learn how the epigenome is established during germ cell development and then modified as cells differentiate. We want to learn how the epigenetic marks interact with the cell's transcriptional machinery to establish the gene expression patterns that are essential for normal development. We want to establish mouse models for the human diseases.

The scientific environment and resources are excellent. Please see http://science.nichd.nih.gov/confluence/display/sgi/Home for more information.

Interested applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 5 years postdoctoral experience. To apply, click on the button below or send your CV with bibliography and a letter describing your research interests to pfeiferk@mail.nih.gov.

Brant Weinstein Lab

Vascular Development in the Zebrafish - A fully funded postdoctoral position is available to study vascular development in the zebrafish in the laboratory of Brant Weinstein in the Division of Developmental Biology (DDB) at the NICHD in Bethesda, MD.  Our group uses molecular, cellular, genetic, and transgenic approaches to study the specification, patterning, and differentiation of the developing vascular system.  Some of our current areas of research interest include: understanding endothelial specification and differentiation into arteries, veins and lymphatics; understanding how vessels assemble into reproducibly patterned networks and what cues guide this patterning; studying how endothelial cells undergo morphogenesis into tubular vessels in vivo using high-resolution multiphoton imaging and experimental manipulation; and isolating novel vascular-specific mutants and studying the molecular basis for their defects.  Scientific environment, resources, and stipend support for this position are superb. See http://uvo.nichd.nih.gov for additional information on the Weinstein lab and http://science.nichd.nih.gov/confluence/display/pgd/Home for additional information on the PGD.

Interested applicants should have a Ph.D. or M.D. and less than 3 years' postdoctoral experience. To apply, send a curriculum vitae, bibliography, cover letter with a brief description of research experience and interests, and the names of 3 references (with phone numbers) via e-mail to phyllis.kornegay@nih.gov.

The NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.


The National Institutes of Health is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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